Songs for Dancing Extensions: Popcorn & Melted Butter

Working with the instrumental-only version of P & MB with 4/5 year olds, the concept was Energy (smooth, sharp, shaky, swinging) and the structure was:

1) Galloping  4 cts  through general space/in place- sway smoothly 3 cts. /REPEAT  sequence 3 times – melt smoothly and pop sharply with music// Listen for quick instructions for next thing
2) Sliding with a swing of the arms 4 cts through general space/  sharp arm and body movement 3 cts in place/ REPEAT  sequence 3 times – melt smoothly and pop sharply with music// Listen for quick instructions for next thing
3) Hopping 4 cts through general space/ float smoothly in place/ REPEAT  sequence 3 times – melt smoothly and pop sharply with music//

Practice without music first.  All move in scattered space. Remember to use soft focus (good potatoes – “eyes everywhere, no mouth”).  Practice one phrase a couple of times.  Layer on.

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October 22, 2012. Tags: , , . Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, What to do with..... 1 comment.

“Songs for Dancing”: Walking Song – Extension Ideas

My friend Cissy Whipp, who teaches dance in an elementary school in Lafayette, LA, has taken the Walking Song from my new Songs for Dancing and adapted it for use a several developmental levels.

First, she printed the visual supports found on the CD, one large for all to see, and small ones for pairs, individuals, and small groups.

The simplest level would be to follow the guided version of the song, with the words, using some scaffolding with “I model, you copy” and “You explore, I say what I see.”  For this, a large version of the visual support is helpful.

The next level would be to let students decide how they are going to interpret what the words mean and make up their own versions, with pathway, direction and other space elements.

As you move towards freeing the students to make their own choices,  use the music-only version.  Students make up their own sequences (and, potentially, their own visual supports) and perform them individually.

To make it more complex and introduce interaction, individuals get together with a partner,  learn each other sequences and perform those in unison and sequentially.  Going further, pairs find pairs and learn all four sequences, performing those in unison, sequentially.  There is room for them to play with the spatial relationships,  too.  It can get quite complex and sophisticated…..bringing what is essentially a primary and pre-primary activity into the intermediate arena.

I haven’t had a chance to try this yet, but I intend to when our fall classes begin.

May 26, 2012. Tags: , . What to do with...., Working with Kate's Material. Leave a comment.