Curriculum-Integration Techniques, and Ideas for K-2

As a Teaching Artist, I often had to generate dance ideas that connect with curriculum.

Here was my approach.

I would research the topic that the grade level was working on, and look for and jot down:

  • Descriptive words (nouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives)
  • Sequence of events that create structure (such as science processes, words of a poem)

I might brainstorm and partially group-write a script or poem with the kids and clean it up later as needed.

 

Then, I’d seek to match my research with:

  • Action (in place)
  • Locomotion (traveling)
  • Shapes (individual, group) that stay
  • Shapes that move (e.g. water that sways, clams that open and shut)
  • Quality of Movement (including expression, emotion)

 

I’d look for:

  • Music selections
  • Words that would guide the action.

(Words and music could be the score, at the same time or alternately.)

Many of my own creations have come out of this process. 

 

Let’s look at some examples for working with younger students (grades K-2)

From AlphaBeat, a couple of science-integration ideas which you can find written up in the AlphaBeat Companion Guide

For 1st “Little Seed” and “Trees”

For mature 1st grade and 2nd “Snowflake Dance”  

Here are some ideas from other resources for 2nd graders

For a dance about the Water Cycle, see “Water Dance” by Thomas Locker as a terrific point of departure. You can excerpt material for spoken word.
For music, I recommend the storm section of Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony and Marimba Dances – 1 from Light in Darkness by Evelyn Glennie.

 

For Habitats (Ocean,  Desert, Rainforest):

I group-wrote, very often, an ocean dance with the students (use Aquarium from Carnival of the Animals as your soundtrack).

For desert,  you can glean from Diane Siebert’s book Mojave.

I wrote my own poem and music for a rainforest dance.  (It’s in the Oct/Nov 2010 Issue of Activate Magazine…see later part of this post)

 

Here’s a list of topics I’ve successfully explored with K-2 students:

Language Arts

  • Alphabet Order
  • Simile
  • Metaphor
  • Punctuation
  • Folk and Fairy Tales
  • Verbs and Adverbs (more a 2nd grade and up thing)

For poetry, I particularly love The Random House Book of Poetry for Children edited by Jack Prelutzky  as a resource

Math

  • Telling time
  • Add – Subtract – Multiply

 

Science

  • The Seasons
  • Insects: metamorphosis, life cycle
  • Weather: water and weather, clouds
  • States of Matter
  • Animals: Adaptations, ways they move

 

Social Studies

 

A couple of other integration pieces (and this is just a small sampling)

Interdisciplinary Learning through Dance – 101 MOVEntures

A book/CD/DVD. Curriculum-integration lessons are divided into K-2 and 3-5th lessons

 

Rhythm of Math: Teaching Mathematics with Body Music (A Kinesthetic Approach)

Keith Terry

A 3-5 focused-curriculum

This resource is very rhythm-centric but it’s a very cool blend with movement and VERY math strong.

 

Anne Green Gilbert and her Laban-based, concept-based approach is great for fundamentals
Including Brain-Compatible Dance Education
and Creative Dance for All Ages, 2nd edition (which came out last year, and includes some video and additional resources as downloads).

 

Some of my documented integration lessons are in issues of Activate! Magazine.

This is mainly for music teachers, but also includes some movement. You can back-order some issues of  Volume 5 that include science-integrated activities for K-2 and companion strategies that go with them.

No. 2: Oct/Nov 2010 – Crazy Locomotion Relays (a great strategy for generating lots of locomotor movement ideas) and Rainforest Dance (Done to an original poem and includes music)

No. 3: Dec/Jan 2010/11 – Animal Tracks

No. 5: April/May 2011 – Water and Weather: Exploring Science through Movement (includes music)

 

If you have ideas of your own, kid-tested  favorites, please share!

 

 

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June 14, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , . Creative Dance Lesson Plans, Curriculum Integration, Favorite Books, Favorite Music, Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Teaching Tips, Thoughts on Teaching Series, Working with Kate's Material. 2 comments.

Thoughts on Teaching: Working with Challenging Groups

This is the 5th post in my “Thoughts on Teaching” Series.

I just completed a two-week residency with a group of 4th graders at a public elementary school in my town. This was a large (28) and diverse group. There were a lot of concentration problems. Some were ‘too cool for school’ and their self-consciousness distracted them. Here were a few issues that came up.

Issue 1: “I don’t want to work with my partner”

A former college student of mine shadowed me on the residency. One of her questions was, “what do you do when kids don’t want to work together?”

Boy, does this one come up in every day life!

It can be very frustrating when one of two children (paired by their classroom teacher rather than self-selected) digs in and says, “he won’t do anything” about his partner.

For us, patience is a virtue. Try several points of entry, and remember that tomorrow is a new day.

1) “Show me what you’ve got.” I just ask them to show me anything and use it as a catalyst to build.

2) “What’s your idea?” Hear from both parties, and model pulling different ideas together. This is a good solution to the problem of: “my partner won’t do anything I say.”

3) “Take a break.” One person may be unable to work that day. Let her sit out, while the compliant student creates. The next day, they may be able to work together and there will be material to start from.

Issue 2: Listening

What’s the point of teaching if you cover the material but the material does not cover the child?

Some quick solutions:

1) “If you can hear me, put your hands on your __________” (head, shoulders, etc.) A quick scan around the room tells you who was tuned out.

2) Have them show (or tell) you. SHOW – When you review what you’ve just presented, have the group raise their hands when they hear the cue (or whatever the content is you are trying to impress upon them). TELL – If you call on the students who know, you’ll still have the space cadets floating out there. So ask the space cadets instead. Sometimes I will tell specific students that I will be calling on them immediately after I give the instruction, and they will have to repeat the key point.

3) Break it into chunks. Smaller bits are easier to digest.

Issue 2: Owning It

When students create and then perform their dances with no energy, apathetically, with small and cramped movements, and a sense of embarrassment, they need coaching.

1) Show 2 ways – Demonstrate the self-conscious, boring way and the energized, committed way.
Have students show, with their fingers indicating #1 or #2, which way was more interesting to watch. (They always pick the committed way). Then talk about why. “The audience doesn’t want to see your attitude about the thing you are doing. They want to see the content. Be committed to what you are doing. Let the audience see it.”

2) Make it bigger! Dances often ‘shrink’ in energy and size. Get everyone on his or her feet and have the students experience a big kinesphere of space, reaching in all directions. This gets the blood flowing and serves as a ‘reset’ too. Then, when they return to their dances, use the kinesphere image for overall size and energy.

3) It’s yours. Remind students that these are their creations. Own it!

May 23, 2016. Tags: , , , , . Behavior Management, Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Special Needs, Teaching Skills, Teaching Tips, Thoughts on Teaching Series. Leave a comment.

Creative Dance: Process versus Product

I was just reading an article about drama in the classroom versus theater for the stage. The author, quoting from a work she’d co-authored, described drama as focused on “the process of the experience for students and teachers, not on a product produced for others.” The co-authors described theater as “a disciplined artistic experience in which artists work and re-work the same material with the goal of performing it perfectly for an audience.” (A Dramatic Approach to Reading Comprehension, Kelner and Flynn, Heinemann, 2006) 

These descriptions were a light bulb moment for me in thinking about creative dance compared to studio techniques, and the way we explain them to others.

The objective in most studio training, as in the description of theater above, is to polish and perfect in order to perform. Many hours of training go into “working and re-working the same material with the goal of performing it perfectly for an audience.” Striving for technical excellence sometimes obscures the reason that many of us were drawn to dance in the first place, namely for the feeling of freedom and joy that we get from moving.

Whenever we are called upon to stand up for the value of creative dance in a studio setting, it is worth remembering – and helping studio parents and administrators to understand – the ‘process’ nature of creative dance and its importance in a well-rounded dance education.

Creative dance provides a lab, an incubator, for improvisation, problem solving, invention, collaboration and critical thinking. Through it we learn the language of dance, dance making, and dance appreciation. While we may choose to polish and share what we create, ‘process’ is at the top of the list.

Ultimately, we can bring the versatile skills of creative dance to the study of ALL techniques to help us become better choreographers and more expressive dancers.

 

 

 

May 6, 2016. Tags: . Studio Teaching, Thoughts on Teaching Series. Leave a comment.

Thoughts on Teaching Series #4: Teaching General Space in a Small Room

This week I worked with several challenging 1st grade groups in the music room. Not a big room, and at least 4 students had poor impulse control.

However, I wanted to do The Stick Together Game (from Step on the Beat) as a follow up to teaching Body Shape Jam (from AlphaBeat) for a lesson on Body Parts. This would involve traveling, stopping, connecting parts, then traveling again with parts connected.

Here’s how I set them up for traveling. First, we did a call and response of “General Space, Go!” with voice and gesture, clapping the syllables of ‘general space,’ and pointing across for ‘go.’

Next, I demonstrated traveling, with words recited rhythmically, while playing the pulse on my hand-held drum:

Move into the empty space/ bodies moves-mouths don’t/ listen for the stopping sound/ stop on your spot//

Each short phrase was 4 beats long, so the demonstration was 2 8’s long, which is a good duration for general space traveling practice. The last 4 counts included shaking the drum to indicate the stop was coming and playing a strong double beat to indicate stop.

I kept my key words to address body control, spatial awareness, and listening skills, which are crucial to success.

Then, we did it as a group, with my words and drum. A third practice was ‘drum talk’ only.

Happy to say that, when we did the group activity in general space, it was a success.

I might add that my locomotor choice for this activity started with walking on the pulse. We could graduate to gallop or skip if students demonstrated the crucial success skills.  But not the ‘r’-sounding one (let the children figure that out themselves!)

 

March 12, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , . Behavior Management, Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Teaching Skills, Teaching Tips, Thoughts on Teaching Series. Leave a comment.

Thoughts on Teaching: How to make a story dance into a concept-based activity

This entry was prompted by a question from reader Kerry B., who is currently teaching at a ballet studio. She wants to know how to integrate the expectations of ballet for young students with the creative, concept-based approach.
Here’s the story dance exemplar she provided, and my response.

Example: “At the Castle”

For ages: 4-5

Story Outline:
Driving to the castle, skipping to castle stable, marching with soldiers to get horses, trotting and galloping with horses, marching to dungeon, creeping around dungeon, tip toe out, walking into garden, hopping on stepping stones.  Tip toe into room to prepare for ball, group and solo dances at ball, grande waltz, leaving ball

 

Music Suggestions:
Driving
– An American in Paris (Gershwin)

Skipping – Skipping Song from Songs for Dancing (instrumental only)

Trotting & Galloping
Galloping Song from Songs for Dancing (instrumental only)
The Magic Toy Shop: Tarantella, Shostakovich
Ballet Suite No. 1: Galop, Tchaikovsky
Swan Lake Suite, Op. 20A – 6 Act3: Spanish Dance

Marching – Firebird: Infernal Dance of King Kastchel’s Subjects, Stravinsky

Creeping – Op.46, In The Hall of Mountain King, Edvard Grieg

Tip toe – Walk – Hop – Tip Toe – Ballet Suite No. 1 – Music Box Waltz, Shostakovich

Waltz – From Coppelia

 

Concept Connections:

 

Driving to the castle… pathways and directions in space.

Skipping to castle stable, marching with soldiers to get horses…. light and strong weight (or can continue with previous concepts)
Trotting and galloping with horses….locomotor movement and speed. (Or can continue with previous concepts) Imagination – be the horses.
Marching to dungeon, creeping around dungeon…. levels in space.

Tip toe out, walking into garden, hopping on stepping stones…. structure a phrase with elements from each locomotor movement idea. Repeat it several times.  Can bring back the pathway and direction concepts.

Tip toe into room to prepare for ball…. This is a transition to reimagining the environment. Preplan with dancers for where they will end in the space for the next section. Potentially a large circle, so that in the next section, dancers will take turns in the middle.

Group and solo dances at ball…. opportunity for ¾ time lyrical improvisational dancing. Can tap dancers on the shoulder to indicate when they dance in. When you cue them to come out, they tap a dancer to take their place.

Grande waltz…everyone dances!
Leaving ball… end in a final body shape.

 

 

 

 

January 23, 2016. Tags: , , , . Creative Dance Lesson Plans, Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Studio Teaching, Teaching Skills, Teaching Tips, Thoughts on Teaching Series. 4 comments.

Thoughts on Teaching #3: Bloom’s Taxonomy

In thinking about moving from simple to complex during the course of a single class or a semester AND in thinking about the importance of creative dance as a means of learning ANY content, I talked about Bloom’s Taxonomy with my college students.
We educators are often called upon to justify our methods, especially as teaching artists in schools, and this is one point of departure for supporting evidence.

We looked at the Cognitive Domains (categories): Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating and Creating.

We discussed how they match up with the lesson components as outlined in Anne Green Gilbert’s books: Warming Up, Introducing the Concept of the day at the board and in the center of the room, Exploring, Developing Skills, Creating and Reflecting.

It is worthwhile to perform this exercise for yourself, comparing Bloom’s to your own class structure.   You discover, happily, that one of the reasons children LOVE the class is because it satisfies so many learning dimensions.  Children who like to practice hard-wiring skills get  to do that during the warm up, developing skills and even creating.   Children who like to invent (and may also be writers, painters, actors, etc.) get to do that during exploring and creating.   Children who lack a rich vocabulary of spoken language and movement, get to build that during the introduction and throughout the class.  Also throughout the class, children learn to interact with others, discover ways of approaching and solving a problem, and become accustom to presenting in front of a group.

An inspiring presenter named Lisa Murphy, who calls herself the Ooey Gooey Lady, suggested that we teachers keep a file of supporting evidence to share when we are called upon to justify our work and our approach.  Add this to your file!

November 1, 2015. Tags: , , , . Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Thoughts on Teaching Series. Leave a comment.

Thoughts on Teaching #2: The First Day of Dance Class

Our lab program meets Saturday mornings. We run two rooms simultaneously.  There are generally 12 children in a class, who have chosen to take this class (self-selected). After our first day with the children (ages 4-5, 6-7, 8-10) here were some remarks I made in response to my college students’ comments.

Building Trust and Emotional Safety

  • Get on your students’ level, physically (particularly important with younger children). Go ahead, squat down!
  • Give them something to do right away (we always have interesting props set out on yoga squares so everyone can go to a spot and find something as they come in the door)
  • Be enthusiastic and supportive
  • Be honest and caring
  • Show interest
  • Be loving
  • Never be afraid of your students. You are the Alpha dog in the pack!
  • Give freedom within structure, which conveys permission to be expressive
  • Consider the “V” of freedom. Start narrow and gradually open out. (As with good parenting).
  • Plan activities that help kids get comfortable with community (like sharing yoga squares with more than one person) and a get-together, welcome, name song
  • Be flexible with the shy kids; the transition may be harder on them. But expect that by 3 days into the semester, they will have adjusted. (although our class rule is no parents in the room, I make an exception for the separation of that one child on that first day).
  • Make sure all voices are heard (call on others besides the raised hands)
  • “No” is a ‘wall’…..look for ‘window’ options instead. “No” is reserved for safety and boundaries (such as it’s not okay to hurt yourself or other people in class)
  • Learn and use students’ names frequently. We take pictures of every child wearing a name tag the first day, then never have to use name tags again.
  • On Day #1, the room should be creative, but structured enough not to be overwhelming. Otherwise, with too much freedom, issues would arise.
  • Set boundaries and expectations the first day, and have an easier time thereafter. Example: Always give instructions while students are seated.
  • Establish audio cues the first day that indicate “clean up, time to warm up”.  My go-to instrument for the start of class is a recorder (block flute) upon which I play a series of 3 simple motifs based around the notes B-A-G.  Each motif guides students to pick up, put away, find a spot for warm up.

 

October 6, 2015. Tags: , , , , . Behavior Management, Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Lesson Plan Organization, Studio Teaching, Teaching Skills, Teaching Tips, Thoughts on Teaching Series, Transition Magic. Leave a comment.

Thoughts on Teaching #1: Making Developmentally Appropriate Choices for Student Activities

Every fall I teach a course called “Creative Dance for Children” that is both a lab program for children ages 4 and 5, 6 and 7 and 8-10 AND a mentoring program for college students who are learning the concept-based approach to teaching dance, based on the work of Anne Green Gilbert. These students attend the lab classes, gradually taking over lesson components as the semester progresses.

This is the first in a series of thoughts on teaching, based on my responses to the college students’ journal entries on different topics.

  • Don’t stick with any one activity for too long, yet examined the same concept through many different activities.
  • Watch how your students move; it may teach you something about where they are emotionally.
  • Give quick directions that did not confuse.
  • Make positive reinforcement authentic. Don’t say ‘good job’ in a rote way. Believe it!
  • Use ‘Say and Do’ as a means of teaching ALL content. Holistic, multi-model learning is hugely effective for retaining information and ‘owning ‘ it. When we are moving, we are learning.
  • Let students figure some things out for themselves. Co-construct the knowledge with them.
  • Provide opportunities to take risks by giving students movement challenges.
  • Give choices – copy me, invent your own, copy your partner, AND model variety.
  • Use the power of visual supports! (words, symbols, drawings, pictures, etc.) to reach ALL learners, including English Language Learners.
  • Don’t always teach from the same side of the room. Change ‘front’ to change up the brain, too, for older students.
  • Include ‘relating to one another’ in your teaching! Isolation makes dance training much harder! The sense of community we build in the classroom can even spill over into the hallways, lunchrooms and playground. Positive!
  • When you keep it moving, keep it structured, and use student demonstrators… kids stay focused and on task. The teacher has control because the students have self-control since they are interested in what is happening.

 

October 3, 2015. Tags: , . Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Thoughts on Teaching Series. Leave a comment.