Thoughts on Teaching #3: Bloom’s Taxonomy

In thinking about moving from simple to complex during the course of a single class or a semester AND in thinking about the importance of creative dance as a means of learning ANY content, I talked about Bloom’s Taxonomy with my college students.
We educators are often called upon to justify our methods, especially as teaching artists in schools, and this is one point of departure for supporting evidence.

We looked at the Cognitive Domains (categories): Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating and Creating.

We discussed how they match up with the lesson components as outlined in Anne Green Gilbert’s books: Warming Up, Introducing the Concept of the day at the board and in the center of the room, Exploring, Developing Skills, Creating and Reflecting.

It is worthwhile to perform this exercise for yourself, comparing Bloom’s to your own class structure.   You discover, happily, that one of the reasons children LOVE the class is because it satisfies so many learning dimensions.  Children who like to practice hard-wiring skills get  to do that during the warm up, developing skills and even creating.   Children who like to invent (and may also be writers, painters, actors, etc.) get to do that during exploring and creating.   Children who lack a rich vocabulary of spoken language and movement, get to build that during the introduction and throughout the class.  Also throughout the class, children learn to interact with others, discover ways of approaching and solving a problem, and become accustom to presenting in front of a group.

An inspiring presenter named Lisa Murphy, who calls herself the Ooey Gooey Lady, suggested that we teachers keep a file of supporting evidence to share when we are called upon to justify our work and our approach.  Add this to your file!

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November 1, 2015. Tags: , , , . Kate Kuper on Teaching Creative Dance, Thoughts on Teaching Series.

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